Economics & Social Policy

Speed, Scale and Simplicity

The government has outlined an audacious package of measures aimed at dealing with the economic consequences of COVID-19, but in a fast- moving environment, it should be no surprise that policy has to continue to evolve. There have already been four fiscal packages in recent weeks, beginning with the Budget, then one focused on the corporate sector, the next on employees and last week’s targeting the self-employed. This has been supported by monetary policy. Despite this, further action is needed supported by another fiscal boost and further monetary action. It is not only the scale of the stimulus that needs to increase, but the execution of the policies. Also, the policy reaction on job protection has been impressively large, but the lack of any precedent means we cannot be certain how the measures will work.

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Limiting the Economic Impact of the Covid-19 Virus

On Thursday, the Chancellor unveiled his fourth round of policy measures to boost the economy during the Coronavirus crisis. He announced what he called a coherent, coordinated and comprehensive scheme for the self-employed. This positive approach from the Chancellor, and the speed of the Government’s response, is worthy of congratulations. Yet inevitably, in this fast-moving crisis, there remain some areas to iron out, largely linked to the policies’ likely execution and administration. The biggest challenge is the delay, as the measures unveiled will take a couple of months to implement, and the strain that this may place on those self-employed who do not have access to income during this time.

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Time to rethink macroeconomic policy

A new Chancellor of the Exchequer and a new Governor of the Bank of England offer the opportunity of taking a fresh look at not just monetary policy, but macro-economic policy as a whole and the role of fiscal policy within it. A decade after the Great Recession, there are profound questions that policy makers should be exploring.

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Putting consumer welfare at the heart of competition policy and market regulation

Related Content   The UK competition authorities, having for years been behind the curve in taking competition and consumer welfare issues with the seriousness that they deserve, are now upping their game significantly. The CMA is demonstrating much greater vim and...
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Boris Johnson sets out the vision for his Premiership

Boris Johnson set out his vision for the United Kingdom on the steps of Downing Street yesterday – in the course of which he embraced many of the ideas championed by Policy Exchange in our series of policy proposals for the next Prime Minister.

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Arlene Foster at PX

Arlene Foster, Leader of the DUP, and Sir Graham Brady back Lord Bew paper on the Irish Backstop

The new PM must “seek a new approach to the Irish border issue as part of a broader strategy after Brexit to stabilise and strengthen the Union,” said a new briefing paper by Lord Bew.

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Latest Economics & Social Policy Publications

Speed, Scale and Simplicity

Speed, Scale and Simplicity

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The government has outlined an audacious package of measures aimed at dealing with the economic consequences of COVID-19, but in a fast- moving environment, it should be no surprise that policy has to continue to evolve. There have already been four fiscal packages in recent weeks, beginning with the Budget, then one focused on the corporate sector, the next on employees and last week’s targeting the self-employed. This has been supported by monetary policy. Despite this, further action is needed supported by another fiscal boost and further monetary action. It is not only the scale of the stimulus that needs to increase, but the execution of the policies. Also, the policy reaction on job protection has been impressively large, but the lack of any precedent means we cannot be certain how the measures will work.

Limiting the Economic Impact of the Covid-19 Virus

Limiting the Economic Impact of the Covid-19 Virus

, , and

On Thursday, the Chancellor unveiled his fourth round of policy measures to boost the economy during the Coronavirus crisis. He announced what he called a coherent, coordinated and comprehensive scheme for the self-employed. This positive approach from the Chancellor, and the speed of the Government’s response, is worthy of congratulations. Yet inevitably, in this fast-moving crisis, there remain some areas to iron out, largely linked to the policies’ likely execution and administration. The biggest challenge is the delay, as the measures unveiled will take a couple of months to implement, and the strain that this may place on those self-employed who do not have access to income during this time.

Latest Economics & Social Policy Blogs

Time to rethink macroeconomic policy

Time to rethink macroeconomic policy

A new Chancellor of the Exchequer and a new Governor of the Bank of England offer the opportunity of taking a fresh look at not just monetary policy, but macro-economic policy as a whole and the role of fiscal policy within it. A decade after the Great Recession, there are profound questions that policy makers should be exploring.

Latest Economics & Social Policy News

Latest Economics & Social Policy Events


  • Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
    14:00 - 15:00

For more than 20 years, the funding of long-term social care has been recognised as a central challenge by successive governments. Arguments around it played a contentious part in the Conservative Party’s election campaign in 2017 – with the proposed solution earning the sobriquet “the Dementia Tax”. The difficulty that the present Government has had in mapping a practical way forward is reflected in the failure to publish the promised green paper. But Policy Exchange’s paper, 21st Century Social Care, provides an answer, arguing that the state should fund long-term social care and complete the welfare state, which polling shows has massive support.


  • Wednesday, 12 June, 2019
    18:00 - 19:00

Josh Frydenberg was elected to the Australian Parliament in 2010 as the Member for Kooyong. He is the seventh person since Federation to hold this seat. In August 2018, he was appointed Treasurer of Australia and Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party, having previously served as Minister for the Environment and Energy, Minister for Resources, Energy and Northern Australia, Assistant Treasurer – and Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister since the 2013 election.


  • Monday, 26 November, 2018
    18:00 - 19:30

Policy Exchange is… multidisciplinary, highly influential, a productive force in the heart of Westminster and our political system,” said Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England, at a Policy Exchange event with Alan Greenspan, former Chairman of the Federal Reserve, and Adrian Wooldridge, The Economist’s Bagehot columnist, to launch their new book, Capitalism in America.


  • Monday, 23 July, 2018
    17:00 - 18:30

Marking the launch of a new paper, Policy Exchange invites you to a panel discussion on “Is Britain’s Growth Model Broken – and Can Brexit Help to Fix It?” The paper’s author Dr Christopher Bickerton will introduce his research, followed by a panel discussion including the former Permanent Secretary to the Treasury Lord Macpherson of Earl’s Court.

Venue:  

Address:
Policy Exchange, 6th Floor, 8 – 10 Great George St, Westminster, London, SW1P 3AE, United Kingdom


  • Monday, 2 July, 2018
    18:00 - 19:30

Adam Smith is now widely regarded as ‘the father of modern economics’ and the most influential economist who ever lived. But what he really thought, and what the implications of his ideas are, remain fiercely contested. Jesse Norman MP’s book shows how, far from being a doctrinaire ‘libertarian’ or ‘neoliberal’ thinker, Smith offers an evolutionary theory of political economy, which balances the roles of markets and the state.


  • Thursday, 28 June, 2018
    13:00 - 14:30

Secretary of State for International Development Rt Hon Penny Mordaunt MP and Brigadier John Deverell spoke on the strategic role of soft power, outlining how her vision for the future of UK development policy applies in the context of civilian–military cooperation, the interplay between hard and soft power, and the importance of development’s role alongside defence and diplomacy.


  • Monday, 21 May, 2018
    8:30 - 15:45

Policy Exchange hosted a major conference considering the future of the Union, with keynote speeches from Ruth Davidson, Michael Gove, Arlene Foster, Brandon Lewis, Alistair Darling, Jim Murphy and Theresa Villiers. In bringing together speakers from different parties, different nations and opposite sides of the Brexit debate, we demonstrated that unionism can be the bridge between the different elements in our divided society.

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