Foreign Secretary sets out vision for Brexit at Policy Exchange

The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Rt Hon Boris Johnson MP, set out his vision for a liberal Brexit in a speech given at Policy Exchange.

Mr Johnson urged Remainers and Leavers to unite behind the opportunities that leaving the EU affords. He said that there is a case for future regulatory divergence from the EU: “We would be mad to go through this process of extrication from the EU, and not to take advantage of the economic freedoms it will bring.” In many areas, however, such as security co-operation and cultural exchange, there would continue to be high levels of engagement.

Global Champion: The case for unilateral free trade

In a major new study, Policy Exchange argues that as the UK leaves the EU, it should unilaterally abolish all tariffs. This would reduce UK consumers’ shopping bills, increase productivity and promote global prosperity. We can also disarm the threat of a ‘No Deal’ Brexit. In the Foreword, Australian High Commissioner to London Alexander Downer said: “Trade is not a zero-sum equation. In the decades ahead all major economies should remove their tariffs and open their markets to competition. As the UK once again takes its place at the WTO it should take the opportunity lead by example and remove its tariffs.”

Making the case for the free market in modern politics

The Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Rt Hon Liz Truss MP, made the case for the free market in an event at Policy Exchange. Truss said that free enterprise has huge economic benefits, driving down prices and creating growth and jobs, and is intensely democratic and open, breaking down monopolies, hierarchies and outdated practices. She added that in the UK we are fortunate to live in one of the freest countries in the world – but warned of a rising Left that would remove economic freedom from individuals and families to the centre. Great economies, Truss said, are not driven forward by central planning but by the “freedom to be disagreeable”. She concluded that supporters of the free market must make the case for opportunities of future innovation, and how it will improve people’s lives.

Rachel Reeves MP

Rachel Reeves MP: Throwing a new light on loneliness

With 9 million people reporting that they are always or often lonely, as a society have we structured loneliness into our lives? Loneliness can be triggered by moments of transition that can happen to us all: the birth of a child, retirement, relationship breakdown, being a newcomer to this country, returning from serving in our armed forces, starting university, moving home, bereavement. The places where we came together – like churches, pubs and the workplace – have changed out of all recognition. Many of our connections have been turned into transactions. Rachel Reeves MP, Co-Chair of the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness, set out what the Commission has learned and gave her thoughts on how we can create a less lonely world. Neil O’Brien OBE MP responded, with the discussion chaired by Daily Mirror Columnist Ros Wynne-Jones.

Modular

Human Rights and Political Wrongs: A new approach to Human Rights law

In a major new study for Policy Exchange, Sir Noel Malcolm, leading historian of ideas and Senior Adviser on Human Rights to Policy Exchange, argues that democracy is being eroded by an ever-expanding system of human rights law and condemns the encroachment of the European Court of Human Rights on democratically-elected parliaments. Sir Noel reaches the conclusion that the best way to protect human rights and align this protection with democratically accountable government is for the UK to leave the jurisdiction of the Court. He appeared on the Today programme to debate the issue with Baroness Kennedy of the Shaws QC, and a panel discussion on the book was covered in the Telegraph by Charles Moore, who described Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project as “a leader in the field”, as well as in The Times‘s legal diary.

Anglo-American conference

New Anglo-American project launched with high-level conference in Washington

Policy Exchange launched our new Anglo-American project with a high level conference in Washington to debate US-UK Relations in a Changing World. Both the US National Security Adviser Lt Gen HR McMaster and the National Security Adviser to the British Prime Minister, Mark Sedwill CMG, spoke at the event – the first time the two holders of these positions have appeared together in public. The event attracted widespread media coverage including from Bloomberg and Newsweek.

Global Champion: The case for unilateral free trade

In a major new study, Policy Exchange argues that as the UK leaves the EU, it should unilaterally abolish all tariffs. This would reduce UK consumers’ shopping bills, increase productivity and promote global prosperity. We can also disarm the threat of a ‘No Deal’ Brexit. In the Foreword, Australian High Commissioner to London Alexander Downer said: “Trade is not a zero-sum equation. In the decades ahead all major economies should remove their tariffs and open their markets to competition. As the UK once again takes its place at the WTO it should take the opportunity lead by example and remove its tariffs.”

Beyond Brexit: Essential reading on international affairs and security in a changing world

Policy Exchange is delighted to announce that Professor John Bew, Head of Policy Exchange’s Britain in the World Project, has been appointed as a specialist adviser to the Foreign Affairs Committee’s inquiry into ‘Global Britain’. To mark that appointment, we publish a new reading list, Beyond Brexit: Essential reading on international affairs and security in a changing world, compiled by Professor Bew, Gabriel Elefteriu, Jamie Gaskarth and Patrick Porter.

Undersea Cables: Indispensable, insecure

We must do more to protect the indispensable yet insecure internet infrastructure provided by undersea cables, urges Rishi Sunak MP in a new report published by Policy Exchange, Undersea Cables: Indispensable, insecure. 97% of global communications and $10 trillion in daily financial transactions are transmitted not by satellites in the skies, but by cables lying deep beneath the ocean. Undersea cables are the indispensable infrastructure of our time, essential to our modern life and digital economy, yet they are inadequately protected and highly vulnerable to attack at sea and on land, from both hostile states and terrorists.

Democracy and Brexit

Reflecting on the Foreign Secretary’s speech at Policy Exchange last week, Director of Research and Strategy Rupert Oldham-Reid summarises the speech.

Britain should unilaterally drop tariffs and become a champion of free trade

Today the Foreign Secretary gave a major speech at Policy Exchange – the first in a series by UK Ministers setting out the Government’s vision for Britain after Brexit. Our advice is simple – Britain should unilaterally drop tariffs and become a champion of free trade. This message has important, progressive consequences and is contained in Policy Exchange’s latest report.

Latest News

Warwick Lightfoot argues for agriculture policy reform on Farming Today

Policy Exchange’s Director of Economics & Social Policy Warwick Lightfoot – former Special Adviser to three Chancellors – appeared on the BBC to argue the case for reform of agriculture policy as Britain leaves the EU. Warwick pressed that farm policy is not currently aimed at supporting consumers and this should be reviewed as the UK moves away from the Common Agricultural Policy.

Events


  • Thursday, 1 February, 2018
    18:00 - 19:30

In his new study for Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project, Sir Noel Malcolm considers European Human Rights law and finds it wanting. This event addresed Sir Noel’s critique of European Human Rights law – and his robust conclusion that the UK ought to withdraw from the Convention. Above all it examined his new approach to the nature of human rights and the place they ought to have in our constitution.


  • Tuesday, 30 January, 2018
    8:00 - 9:00

The Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Rt Hon Liz Truss MP, made the case for the free market in an event at Policy Exchange. Truss said that free enterprise has huge economic benefits, driving down prices and creating growth and jobs, and is intensely democratic and open, breaking down monopolies, hierarchies and outdated practices.

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