The Collapse of the Kenyan Emergency Group Litigation: causes and consequences

Dec 3, 2018

UK forces rightly adhere to the law of armed conflict, which is secured in practice by service law and the criminal law. However, like other persons, and indeed like the Government itself, they are also entitled to the protection of the rule of law and should not be tried unfairly or pursued by way of inappropriate legal processes. The ongoing pursuit of historical allegations against UK forces represents a failure on the part of the British state to protect those it asks to serve.

Author

Jonathan Duke-Evans

Former Head of Claims, Judicial Reviews and Public Inquiries, Ministry of Defence Read Full Bio

Professor Richard Ekins

Richard Ekins
Head of the Judicial Power Project Read Full Bio

Julie Marionneau

Research Fellow, Judicial Power Project Read Full Bio

Tom Tugendhat

Tom Tugendhat
Conservative MP for Tonbridge, Edenbridge, and Malling Read Full Bio

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