Not Working: Why workfare should replace the New Deal

Mar 18, 2004

By Adam Bogdanor

Although long-term youth unemployment has fallen since its introduction, the New Deal has not been as successful as the government likes to claim. Adam Bogdanor illustrates how much of the fall would have happened anyway, that 60% of New Deal leavers still fail to find sustained, unsubsidised jobs and that each job created costs the taxpayer £22,000. The solution is to replace the New Deal with Workfare, pioneered in Wisconsin, which has successfully and efficiently reduced welfare rolls.

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