Publications Archive

July 21, 2014

by Guy Miscampbell and Ruth Porter

June 24, 2014

by Policy Exchange

By 2050, global output is projected to treble, with two-thirds of growth coming from emerging economies. The developed world will have to change radically if it is to adapt to this new environment successfully. To realise the opportunities of the next four decades successfully – for the developing world to adapt to dramatic social and economic changes, and for the developed world to face its structural, fiscal and demographic challenges and ‘pay its way’ in the years ahead, it is vital that these long-term issues are addressed.

June 12, 2014

by Simon Moore and Guy Newey

Connecting the UK to power stations in other countries could help bring down energy bills and meet our decarbonisation targets. Getting Interconnected shows that interconnectors could save British consumers as much as £1bn a year, as well as allowing access to zero-carbon electricity. The report calls for overseas generators to be allowed to compete for government subsidy in the new capacity market and endorses ways to ensure that revenue supports development of new interconnector links.

June 4, 2014

by Eddie Copeland, Cameron Scott and Sarah Fink

Politicians and policymakers must put technology front and centre of their thinking for the 2015 general election. This manifesto sets out three principal goals: to build the world’s most connected and digitally skilled society; to make Britain the most attractive place outside of Silicon Valley for technology entrepreneurs to start and grow a business; and to make our government the smartest in the world.

May 6, 2014

by Policy Exchange

For too long, people from ethnic minorities have been categorised under the catch-all title of “BME”. But this title does not depict the clear and meaningful differences between each of the communities that come under this title. A Portrait of Modern Britain draws on an extensive set of survey, census, academic and polling data to build up a detailed picture of the five largest minority groups in the UK. It outlines the demographics, geography, life experiences, attitudes and socioeconomic status of each of these major ethnic groups.

April 27, 2014

by Neil O'Brien

Is there a north-south divide political divide? A major study into public attitudes – Northern Lights – examines the new political and social geography of England. The research finds that the way people vote is less and less determined by their social class, and more by how they think the government is performing and their attitudes to controversial issues like migration and crime.

April 22, 2014

by Alex Morton and Owen Corrigan

This report is Policy Exchange’s contribution to retirement housing provider Hanover’s Hanover@50 debate on the future of housing for older people. The report says reform of the planning system to encourage developers to build more homes, including bungalows and self build homes attractive to older people looking to downsize, is the fairer way of reducing the generational divide.

April 11, 2014

by Emily Redding

Board Rules: Improving corporate governance, reveals that the solutions proposed and enacted by the government to drive up the standards of corporate governance among UK companies amount to little more than, “a damp squib”. The report recommends that investor representatives should be appointed to board nomination committees and that CEOs should be banned from such bodies.

March 27, 2014

by Matthew Tinsley and Ruth Porter

Taxing Jobs argues that because pay and productivity have remained strongly linked over the course of the recession, wages will begin to rise and productivity will improve as employers take on more staff. Providing a boost to the labour market in the form of a cut to the payroll tax for businesses would speed up the rate at which companies take on more staff. This would reduce unemployment more quickly and force employers to improve productivity and therefore pay among their workforces.

March 17, 2014

by Jonathan Simons and Harriet Waldegrave

Watching the Watchmen calls for a fundamental change in the power relationship between schools and Ofsted. It calls for lesson observations to be ditched, for Ofsted to consider abolishing or radically reducing the number of inspectors contracted to private companies and for inspectors to have relevant and recent teaching experience. It also proposes a new two-stage inspection process that will allow more resources to be focused on struggling schools.

March 3, 2014

by Guy Miscampbell

February 21, 2014

by Charlotte McLeod, Max Chambers and Ruth Davis

Future Courts calls for magistrates to dispense justice inside police stations at peak times – including evenings and weekends – and be put in charge of the administration of out-of-court disposals, as part of a radical drive to speed up the operation of the criminal justice system.

January 24, 2014

by Matthew Oakley and Alice Harber

Some 48,530 children are now in a care system that is letting many of them down and is in radical need of reform.Fostering Aspirations makes a number of recommendations to increase the number of carers and improve the quality of care children receive.

January 22, 2014

by James Barty

11 million people are at risk of entering ‘pensioner poverty’ when they retire. With the average pension pot standing at £36,800 a person will need to save six and a half times more to reach the £240,000 required to generate the government’s recommended retirement income of £16,200. Help to Save calls for government to make it obligatory for people to save for their retirement by removing the opt-out in the existing auto-enrolment scheme while also increasing individual contributions to pensions as their incomes rise over time.

January 17, 2014

by Matthew Tinsley

Parenting Alone calls for more support to help lone parents with young children into work. The report finds although the number of lone parents working is higher than in the 1990s, 650,000 – or 1 in 3 – are still unemployed. It recommends more intensive support for lone parents when their youngest child is 3 or 4 and measures to stabilise the income of those moving from benefits into work or to higher paid work.

January 12, 2014

by Paul Garaud

January 3, 2014

by Jonathan Simons

Reversing the ‘Widget Effect’ welcomes the government’s introduction of performance pay in schools. The report shows that performance-related pay has been implemented in other countries without adverse effects for teachers or students, and finds that overwhelmingly teachers want to be paid based on the quality of their teaching. The report stresses that the system implemented must be fair and transparent in order to succeed, and sets out what a well-designed system would look like.

December 17, 2013

by Simon Moore

On 21st November 2013, Policy Exchange held a roundtable discussion on ways to improve the emissions performance of London’s road transport, and how local and national government policy can develop to reduce pollution and improve public health. This publication is a summary of the remarks made at that event.

December 16, 2013

by James Barty

This report argues that a rigid ringfence around UK banking activities risks creating a swathe of unintended consequences including further closures of high street branches and even the end of ‘free’ banking. However, due to the amount of political capital already expended on legislation, ringfencing legislation is unlikely to be abandoned, so the report sets out a number of recommendations to ensure that UK banks remain competitive and are in a position to be able to lend to businesses and consumers.

December 13, 2013

by Lynne Middleton and Dr Michael Pinto-Duschinsky

Reforming Public Appointments shows that equality policies set up under the last government are failing to promote people from working class communities to public office. It calls for an extension of the entire equalities policy to increase representation of people from routine and manual occupational backgrounds, and for greater transparency about the membership of interviewing panels for public appointments.

November 19, 2013

by Katherine Drayson and Guy Newey

Britain’s urban green spaces are coming under pressure, with financial and development constraints, coupled with a surprising lack of data, raising the possibility of a decline in the quantity and quality of our urban green spaces. Park Landcalls for a new freely-available national urban green space map for the UK to help make sure people living in cities have adequate access to good green spaces, test whether public money is being well spent and allow clever innovations in improving green spaces to be easily shared.

November 7, 2013

by Policy Exchange

Taxing Issues? examines the barriers to home ownership, including the pros and cons of introducing new land and property taxes. The report argues that the best way to bring down the cost of home ownership and tackle market volatility is to scrap increases in property taxes, urging policymakers instead to focus on building 1.5 million new homes by 2020.

October 18, 2013

by Policy Exchange

A new Policy Exchange report, The Fog of Law, co-authored by Tom Tugendhat and Laura Croft, shows how the application of civilian norms to military conduct has led to a surge in legal claims against the Ministry of Defence (MOD). The costs of litigation have now risen out of proportion with forecasts, with the number of claims brought against the MOD totalling 5,827 in 2012-2013.

October 14, 2013

by Guy Miscampbell and James Barty

A new Policy Exchange report, The Fog of Law, co-authored by Tom Tugendhat and Laura Croft, shows how the application of civilian norms to military conduct has led to a surge in legal claims against the Ministry of Defence (MOD). The costs of litigation have now risen out of proportion with forecasts, with the number of claims brought against the MOD totalling 5,827 in 2012-2013.

October 11, 2013

by Matthew Oakley

Public sector workers in the North East, Merseyside and South West of England earn as much as £3,200 more than their equivalents in the private sector. The variation in pay has arisen because of the system of national pay bargaining, which means that workers are paid the same amount regardless of where they live. The paper recommends abolishing national pay deals and moving to a system which can reflect local labour markets and reward performance.

September 29, 2013

by Ed Holmes

New polling conducted for Policy Exchange has found strong public support by a margin of nearly 5 to 1 for the introduction of workfare schemes. While the report warns against rolling out workfare for large numbers of benefit claimants as too costly and potentially detrimental to some, it does argue that the government should pilot workfare schemes for specific groups of jobseekers.

September 17, 2013

by Harriet Waldegrave

Centres of Excellence? acknowledges that families from all backgrounds face rising childcare costs. However, it argues that in a time of stretched budgets, supporting high quality care for children from deprived backgrounds offers greater value for money than subsidies to the richest parents. It also argues that the government is right to allow childcare to be delivered in a range of settings, rather than just Children’s Centres.

September 13, 2013

by Alex Morton

This report finds that Town Centre First, a policy intended to support the high street by limiting out-of-town shopping centres, has decreased competition between retailers, damaged the social fabric of communities and caused price rises of at least £1,000 a year for the average household. Town Centre First should be replaced with an ‘Access First’ policy, focussed on giving low income households access to social and retail hubs, but not restricting where these retail centres should be built.

September 11, 2013

by Matthew Tinsley

Cultures of Dependency says that in the future employment support must better understand the pressures that families, social networks and communities put on unemployed people. Devolving power and money would allow individual Jobcentres to pilot new innovative ways of delivering local personalised support to help people find a job. Support could also be targeted at whole families, peer groups or estates in order to tackle serious barriers to work like a poor work ethic or family problems.

September 2, 2013

by Sarah Fink and Chris Yiu

Smaller, Better, Faster, Stronger shows how government could save as much as £70 billion by 2020 if it adopted plans to eliminate paper and digitise its activities, work smarter with fewer staff in Whitehall, shop around for the best procurement deals, and accelerate the use of data and analytics.

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