Publications Archive

June 26, 2007

by Jonathan McClory and Gavin Lockhart

Fitting the Bill investigates whether, and to what extent, increased local autonomy for the police could improve policing.

Policy Exchange

June 1, 2007

by Policy Exchange

This is the published version of the inaugural Colin Cramphorn Memorial Lecture, hosted by Policy Exchange, given by Peter Clarke, the Head of the Metropolitan Police Counter Terrorism Command. The lecture focused on the issues of national security and the fight against terrorism since 9/11.

Policy Exchange

April 17, 2007

by James O'Shaughnessy

We expect more of our school leaders than ever before. Gone is the view of the head teacher as primus inter pares; they are now supposed to be visionary leaders, curriculum specialists, disciplinarians, senior managers, community representatives and, just occasionally, teachers too. They are expected to transform the worst state schools and maintain performance in the best. But is this emphasis on leadership justified? Can headteachers make a difference?

Policy Exchange

January 29, 2007

by Munira Mirza

This report finds that there is a growing religiosity amongst the younger generation of Muslims and that they feel that they have less in common with non-Muslims than do their parents. Significantly, they exhibit a much stronger preference for Islamic schools and sharia law and place a greater stress on asserting their identity publicly, for example, by wearing the hijab.

Policy Exchange

January 24, 2007

by Dr Oliver Marc Hartwich

The Best Laid Plans concludes that the main objective of planning has been to limit the spatial extent of cities and that this artificial reduction of land supply has severe consequences for society, the environment and the economy.

Policy Exchange

December 12, 2006

by Glyn Gaskarth

This report outlines a better model of local government: an innovative model of ‘federal’ county government, which streamlines bureaucracy and presents a unified public face, while power originates at a very local level and is delegated up where necessary.

Policy Exchange

November 23, 2006

by Dr Oliver Marc Hartwich

Science vs Superstition – the case for a new scientific enlightenment challenges the common belief that scientific progress in today’s world inevitably entails an element of danger or moral uncertainty.

Policy Exchange

November 6, 2006

by Jesse Norman MP

Living for the City brings out crucial yet unexpected links between ‘direct democracy’ or greater citizen participation in community action and local decision-making; greener, healthier and safer city environments; and improved economic growth.

Policy Exchange

October 2, 2006

by Roger Gough

Using demographic projections to map key public policy challenges UK society faces over the next 50 years, Policy Exchange – together with charity Age Concern – has commissioned MPs, academics and business figures to consider the policy tools needed for younger generations to be able to approach later life with confidence.

Policy Exchange

July 1, 2006

by Policy Exchange

Martin Bright’s unique run of classified ‘scoops’ on the British State’s policy of accommodating Islamist reactionaries at home and abroad has set all kinds of dovecotes a-flutter in Whitehall. Now, courtesy of Policy Exchange, Bright has brought them all together in one accessible pamphlet – as well as some hitherto unpublished material which the Government would rather we never had seen.

Policy Exchange

June 14, 2006

by Janan Ganesh and Jesse Norman MP

What is compassionate conservatism, and how can it meet the social and political challenges faced by today’s Britain? These are the questions that Jesse Norman and Janan Ganesh answer in their acclaimed new book.

Policy Exchange

June 12, 2006

by Policy Exchange

Much of the discourse on the war on terror has sacrificed historical perspective for an often partisan focus on the day-by-day flow of events. Confessions of a hawkish hack: the media and the war on terror is Matthew D’Ancona’s critique of such short-termism. In it, he outlines his own interpretation of the attacks of 9/11 and the media’s coverage of events since then.

Policy Exchange

March 10, 2006

by Jacqueline Riozzi

Size Isn’t Everything argues that since small forces perform at least as well as larger forces, and since amalgamations would reduce accountability and take resources from neighbourhood policing, the government should abandon its attempts to amalgamate police forces.

Policy Exchange

February 20, 2006

by Dr Oliver Marc Hartwich

Better Homes, Greener Cities shows that too few houses are built in Britain because local communities have no incentives to support new development.

Policy Exchange

January 19, 2006

by Munira Mirza

Culture Vultures: Is UK arts policy damaging the arts? examines the impact of government policy on the arts through a collection of essays edited by Munira Mirza.

Policy Exchange

December 9, 2005

by James O'Shaughnessy

More Good School Places calls for all children at failed state schools to receive up to £6,000 additional funding per annum – the Advantage Premium – to help them access better education.

Policy Exchange

September 15, 2005

by Dr Oliver Marc Hartwich

Bigger Fast Better More shows that in countries where local councils have to “compete for every inhabitant” they successfully plan for better and cheaper homes in sustainable, green communities.

June 27, 2005

by Dr Oliver Marc Hartwich

The key finding of this report is that the British culture of centrally-planned development – a system established by the 1947 Town and Country Planning Act and embraced to this day by politicians of all parties – has resulted in a woeful shortage of affordable, desirable, high-quality housing.

Policy Exchange

June 15, 2005

by Policy Exchange

No More School Run: Proposal for a national yellow bus scheme in the UK argues that a system of school buses would increase punctuality for all road users, have economic benefits and improve quality of life.

Policy Exchange

May 11, 2005

by Policy Exchange

Hands up for school choice! Lessons from school choice schemes at home and abroad examines case studies from abroad, drawing out common characteristics of school choice and the use of voucher schemes involving both public and private providers.

Policy Exchange

March 10, 2005

by Policy Exchange

Taming Terrorism reminds us that despite al-Qaeda’s global reach and use of modern technology, today’s global struggle is not unprecedented. We have beaten similar groups before and can do so again.

January 10, 2005

by Mark MacGregor

MacGregor, former Director of Steve Norris’s campaign to be Mayor of London, comes to the surprising conclusion that the current Mayor Ken Livingstone is right to demand direct control of policing.

November 10, 2004

by Policy Exchange

Big Bang Localism: a Rescue Plan for British Democracy, proposes a radical decentralisation of government. The report calls for a re-empowerment of the counties and cities to which people feel loyalty, with many services delegated further to municipalities and parishes.

August 19, 2004

by Policy Exchange

Nothing to lose but your chains is the third volume of a major study into the reform of local government finance in England. It sets out the authors’ proposals for a comprehensive, yet practical, reform of the local revenue finance system.

March 18, 2004

by Policy Exchange

This report concludes that the solution to the problem of long-term youth unemployment is to replace the New Deal with Workfare, pioneered in Wisconsin, which has successfully and efficiently reduced welfare rolls.

January 15, 2004

by Policy Exchange

Lion Cubs brings together four country case studies – of Tanzania, Botswana, Rwanda and Mozambique. The studies show that even the poorest and most divided societies can be turned around, given good policies and – harder – the will to put them into practice.

November 12, 2003

by Policy Exchange

In the first part of a major study into local government financial reform, Policy Exchange examines the history of local government funding in England and Wales, from feudalism through the Victorian period to present day. The authors show how the contemporary system of highly centralised control is a product of the government’s desire to maintain uniformity and fiscal discipline.

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