Crime & Justice

Daylight Robbery

Research by Policy Exchange finds that fraud and error during the COVID-19 crisis will cost the UK Government in the region of £4.6 billion. The lower bound for the cost of fraud in this crisis is £1.3 billion and the upper bound is £7.9 billion, in light of total projected expenditure of £154.3 billion by the Government (excluding additional expenditure announced in the 8th July 2020 Economic Update). The true value may be closer to the upper bound, due to the higher than usual levels of fraud that normally accompany disaster management.

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Exiting Lockdown

The UK Government should extend its Five Pillar Testing Strategy to a Six Pillar Testing and Tracing Strategy by introducing digital contact tracing as a Sixth Pillar. A Testing and Tracing Strategy should bring together expertise from the Department of Health, NHSX, NHS Digital, Police, Military and the Intelligence Agencies, to create a new independent national 24/7 Testing and Tracing Command Centre.

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Policing a pandemic

The Coronavirus pandemic represents the biggest challenge to UK police since the Second World War, according to Richard Walton, Senior Fellow at Policy Exchange and former Head of Counter-Terrorism Command at the Metropolitan Police. The paper – Policing a pandemic, part of a new series from Policy Exchange examining the policy impact of the coronavirus pandemic – recognises that, in the words of the Chief Medical Officer Prof Chris Whitty, the response of the British public to disasters and emergencies tends to be “extraordinary outbreaks of altruism”. It also notes that some aspects of criminal behaviour are very likely to decrease during periods of social distancing, for example alcohol-related disorderly behaviour, including violence that can occur in and around bars, pubs, nightclubs and restaurants, reducing police demand for emergency response calls. But the paper warns of a minority who will exploit the pandemic for criminal purposes and sets out new challenges that are likely to be faced by the police.

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The Law of the Constitution before the Court

The Supreme Court’s prorogation judgment, Miller/Cherry, was contrary to the settled law of the constitution. This paper, which complements and completes an earlier critique, refutes attempts to deny the judgment’s revolutionary character, attempts that cannot be squared with key facts about prorogation in the run-up to the Bill of Rights 1689, with Erskine May’s Law and Practice of Parliamentary, and with the primary 20th century textbook on the law of the constitution. The paper details the factual misjudgements and injustices at the heart of the Supreme Court’s judgment, and confirms the wisdom of the law of non-justiciability that the judgment casts aside.

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Justice that protects

Prisons exist to keep the public safe yet in recent years the Ministry of Justice and Her Majesty’s Prisons and Probation Service has shown that they are not capable of properly managing the most dangerous offenders. This paper, by Richard Walton – a former Head of the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command – argues that it is time for the Home Secretary, and the Home Office, to supervise prisons as they did until 2007. The Ministry of Justice as it is currently configured should be abolished, with a new Lord Chancellor’s Department replacing it to work solely on courts and justice policy, at the same time enshrining in law and practice the independence of the judiciary.

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Protest, Parliament and the rule of law

With the rhetoric inside the House of Commons ratcheted up to fever pitch this week, it is hardly surprising that protest outside Parliament became equally as chaotic and disruptive.

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Latest Crime & Justice Publications

Latest Crime & Justice Blogs

Putting rocket boosters on the rehabilitation revolution

Putting rocket boosters on the rehabilitation revolution

Max Chambers, Policy Exchange’s new Head of Crime & Justice, analyses Justice Secretary Chris Grayling’s speech on Payment by Results (PbR). Max welcomes the renewed focus on the PbR agenda, but argues that PbR needs to be a means to a bigger end – a truly outcome-focused criminal justice system where all parties are focused on a common aim.

What is the point of Police and Crime Commissioners?

What is the point of Police and Crime Commissioners?

Edward Boyd, Crime & Justice Research Fellow at Policy Exchange, argues that the incoming role of Police & Crime Commissioners should have been better communicated in the run up to the elections, but stresses that despite poor voter turnout, this is still an important opportunity for change in policing.

Police and Crime Commissioners are here to stay

Police and Crime Commissioners are here to stay

Edward Boyd, Crime & Justice Research Fellow at Policy Exchange, sets out why PCCs are a good idea, advocating the fact that they remove control of police priorities from Whitehall and give the public a voice in setting police priorities.

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RT @ed_birkett I’m quoted in @thetimes today on delivering the petrol and diesel phase-out. “Norway has shown that lower VAT and free parking for EVs increases sales,” he said. “However, these policies are expensive and probably aren’t affordable at the moment.” 1/2 thetimes.co.uk/editi…

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RT @ed_birkett I’m quoted in @thetimes today on delivering the petrol and diesel phase-out. “Norway has shown that lower VAT and free parking for EVs increases sales,” he said. “However, these policies are expensive and probably aren’t affordable at the moment.” 1/2 thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/n…

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