Britain In The World

A Policy Exchange Project
Strategic Map

Net Assessment for the MOD: Implementation is Key

Net Assessment is a tremendous opportunity for a strategic renaissance – we must get it right from the beginning

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Satellite

Spaceports will transform the UK into a spacefaring nation

Policy Exchange’s senior defence fellow, Gabriel Elefteriu, reflects on the Government’s decision to build a spaceport in Scotland. He argues the decision is an important step on on the UK’s journey to become a leader in space industry.

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Space dawn

Britain’s industry-led space policy “model” has been a resounding success. But can it survive the fierce competition of the new space race?

The UK has made significant progress developing its approach to space, including the passage of the recent Space Bill and announcement of the Space Strategy, argues Policy Exchange’s Senior Research Fellow for Defence Gabriel Elefteriu. Discussing the event held at Policy Exchange to explore these issues, Gabriel argues that more will be required if the UK is to fully take advantage of the opportunities offered by this new frontier.

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Union Flag

Strong support for the Union across all parts of the UK

As Policy Exchange hosts a major conference on the future of the Union, exclusive new polling reveals that popular support for Union remains strong and British identification is robust’.

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Union Flag

Monarchy helps unify the country post-Brexit, new poll finds

A clear majority of people in all parts of the United Kingdom think that the monarchy unifies the country following the Brexit referendum, according to polling data carried out exclusively for Policy Exchange. Even in Scotland and Northern Ireland, which voted to remain in the EU, more than double think the monarchy brings the country together than the reverse.

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Parliament can play a greater role in foreign affairs

In a new report published today, Foreign Policy in the New Parliament, Policy Exchange stresses the vital role of Parliament in debates about Britain’s place in the world. Against the backdrop of a hung parliament, and with Brexit-related legislation likely to be divisive in the House of Commons, the government will very much hope to avoid a major House of Commons vote on a controversial foreign policy issue. A new database of MPs’ voting records, as well as their constituency positions on Brexit, also demonstrates the dangers of internal division facing both main parties.

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Latest Publications

After Brexit: Will Ireland be next to exit?

After Brexit: Will Ireland be next to exit?

In a flagship new report for Policy Exchange, former senior Irish Ambassador Ray Bassett argues that a failure to reach a benign compromise between the EU and the UK in Brexit negotiations risks seriously damaging the Irish economy. So far, the Irish Government has sided firmly with the EU27, but Bassett believes this may be a mistake given how intimately the Irish and British economies are connected. In the event of the UK leaving the Customs Union and the Single Market, Ireland may be forced to follow suit, potentially even seeking its own “Irexit”.

The Cost of Doing Nothing: The Price of Inaction in the Face of Mass Atrocities

The Cost of Doing Nothing: The Price of Inaction in the Face of Mass Atrocities

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This report is based on work begun by Jo Cox MP (1974-2016) and Tom Tugendhat MP. It was completed by Alison McGovern MP and Tom Tugendhat MP

“There are few more complex questions than when to intervene overseas. Jo Cox was an inspirational humanitarian who cared deeply about preventing violence and protecting people around the world. It is a fitting part of Jo’s legacy that this paper will challenge politicians of all parties to consider how we can put such considerations at the heart of the decisions we take.” (Rt Hon Theresa May MP, Prime Minister.

Latest Blogs

The return of the internationalists? Unpacking Labour’s position on foreign policy.

The return of the internationalists? Unpacking Labour’s position on foreign policy.

Last week, Chuka Umunna spoke to Chatham House in a much-needed intervention on the state of British foreign policy.

In recent years, the British foreign policy debate has not kept up with the pace of global political and economic change. For that reason alone, there was much to commend in Umunna’s sense of urgency. To adapt to the challenges of the twenty-first century, as he put it, “we need to look ahead and develop a proper national strategy on the basis of a clear understanding of what our interests are”.

DExEU’s paper on post-Brexit UK-EU security and defence cooperation: a question of influence

DExEU’s paper on post-Brexit UK-EU security and defence cooperation: a question of influence

National Security Fellow Gabriel Elefteriu responds to the launch of the Government’s new paper on UK-EU security and defence cooperation after Brexit. The paper is a welcome starting point in efforts to improve the “mood music”, given recent acrimony in Brexit negotiations. It is right to stress areas of common interest with the EU27 and the UK’s vital role in European security, which is likely to continue for many years. However, there are still questions to answer about the proposed “deep and special relationship” with the EU, and how this is to be squared with renewed efforts to reinvigorate the NATO alliance.

After the North Korean crisis

After the North Korean crisis

Britain in the World Research Fellow Gabriel Elefteriu discusses further implications of the North Korea crisis, noting that there is “no historical precedent for the present crisis, and attempting to apply ‘lessons’ from the past is extremely dangerous in these circumstances.” War “could be catastrophic in material and geopolitical terms, with incalculable evolutions and consequences” but the crisis is likely to force the US to devote even more resources to the Pacific, with consequences for its strategic posture in other parts of the world.

Latest News

Niall Ferguson compares balance of power to Congress of Vienna at Policy Exchange’s Anglo-American conference

Niall Ferguson compares balance of power to Congress of Vienna at Policy Exchange’s Anglo-American conference

Professor Niall Ferguson, who spoke at the launch of Policy Exchange’s new Anglo-American project, argued that the best historical analogy for the current balance of powers is with the pentarchy of five great powers that dominated European (and hence world) affairs for a century after the Congress of Vienna of 1814-15. A modern pentarchy was created in the form of the permanent members of the UN Security Council. Professor Ferguson argues that “Whether or not these five great powers can make common cause once again is the great geopolitical question of our time.”

Policy Exchange’s John Bew wins Orwell Prize

Policy Exchange’s John Bew wins Orwell Prize

Policy Exchange is delighted to congratulate Professor John Bew, Head of our Britain in the World project, after his outstanding biography of Clement Attlee last night won the prestigious Orwell Prize.

Latest Events

What Would Clem Do?

What Would Clem Do?

Oct 11, 2016

‘Citizen Clem’, the new biography of Clement Attlee, written by John Bew, head of Policy Exchange’s Britain in the World project, provides the focus for a panel discussion on Labour’s past and future

East or West: where does the future of UK Foreign Policy lie?

East or West: where does the future of UK Foreign Policy lie?

Sep 14, 2016

Policy Exchange’s Britain in the World Project examines the UK’s relationship with Asia and the opportunities and challenges post-Brexit. With Gideon Rachman, Chief Foreign Affairs columnist of the Financial Times and Con Coughlin, Defence Editor of the Daily Telegraph

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