Recent Blogs

The Spending Review – why transparency matters

The Spending Review – why transparency matters

Jonathan Dupont, Policy Exchange’s Economic and Social Policy Research Fellow, sets out why transparency in government spending is essential in the long run. Such transparency, he argues, gives confidence that government can combine value for money with protecting the quality of public services.

How hard will the Spending Review be?

How hard will the Spending Review be?

In the second of his series of blogs ahead of the 2015 Spending Review, Policy Exchange Economics & Social Policy Research Fellow Jonathan Dupont looks at just how challenging the Chancellor’s task will be.

Making the Case Against Expansive Judicial Power

Making the Case Against Expansive Judicial Power

Reflecting on Professor Finnis’ recent lecture on the past, present and future of judicial power, and on responses to the lecture, Professors Ekins and Gee consider how best to make the case against expansive judicial power. They argue that the public and politicians should be free to debate frankly the role of the courts in our constitution, welcoming the willingness of some in the political class to restate the traditional limits on judicial power and emphasising the primacy of an elected Parliament as the safeguard against injustice and the disadvantages of remaking the law by judicial process.

Richard Howard reviews Amber Rudd’s energy policy reset speech

Richard Howard reviews Amber Rudd’s energy policy reset speech

Richard Howard, Policy Exchange’s Head of Environment & Energy, reviews energy secretary Amber Rudd’s recent speech on resetting energy policy. The most significant announcements included plans to phase out coal generation by 2025 and the government’s willingness to support up to 10GW of additional offshore wind capacity.

Cameron was right to revise the Ministerial Code

Cameron was right to revise the Ministerial Code

ConservativeHome Assistant Editor Henry Hill quotes from John Finnis’s recent article for Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project on changes to the Ministerial Code. Professor Finnis argued that the 2010 Code implied an overarching duty to comply with international law and treaty obligations, which was not constitutionally sound.

Ministers, International Law, and the Rule of Law

Ministers, International Law, and the Rule of Law

Following the recent controversy over changes to the Ministerial Code, Professor John Finnis explains for Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project, why the 2010 Code was wrong to imply that Ministers have an overarching duty to comply with international law and treaty obligations and why the formulation used in the 2015 Code is constitutionally sound.

The Ministerial Code and the Rule of Law

The Ministerial Code and the Rule of Law

In their post for Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project, Richard Ekins and Guglielmo Verdirame challenge the claim that recent changes to the Ministerial Code undermine the rule of law and deny that courts may review such changes.

Mike Flowers interview

Mike Flowers interview

Eddie Copeland, Policy Exchange’s Head of Technology Policy, interviews Mike Flowers, the founding director of New York’s Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics, about his experiences of applying data analytics to urban environments.

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