Government & Politics Blogs

Making the Case Against Expansive Judicial Power

Making the Case Against Expansive Judicial Power

Reflecting on Professor Finnis’ recent lecture on the past, present and future of judicial power, and on responses to the lecture, Professors Ekins and Gee consider how best to make the case against expansive judicial power. They argue that the public and politicians should be free to debate frankly the role of the courts in our constitution, welcoming the willingness of some in the political class to restate the traditional limits on judicial power and emphasising the primacy of an elected Parliament as the safeguard against injustice and the disadvantages of remaking the law by judicial process.

Cameron was right to revise the Ministerial Code

Cameron was right to revise the Ministerial Code

ConservativeHome Assistant Editor Henry Hill quotes from John Finnis’s recent article for Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project on changes to the Ministerial Code. Professor Finnis argued that the 2010 Code implied an overarching duty to comply with international law and treaty obligations, which was not constitutionally sound.

Ministers, International Law, and the Rule of Law

Ministers, International Law, and the Rule of Law

Following the recent controversy over changes to the Ministerial Code, Professor John Finnis explains for Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project, why the 2010 Code was wrong to imply that Ministers have an overarching duty to comply with international law and treaty obligations and why the formulation used in the 2015 Code is constitutionally sound.

The Ministerial Code and the Rule of Law

The Ministerial Code and the Rule of Law

In their post for Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project, Richard Ekins and Guglielmo Verdirame challenge the claim that recent changes to the Ministerial Code undermine the rule of law and deny that courts may review such changes.

The Conservatives must become the party for the ‘just about managing’ class

The Conservatives must become the party for the ‘just about managing’ class

James Frayne, Policy Exchange’s Director of Policy and Strategy, sets out the findings from Overlooked But Decisive, our new report profiling C1 and C2 voters. Such voters values above all else family and fairness. This means these voters want an active, practical approach from Government that helps improve their everyday lives. But they also want to see the Government create a fairer system where hard work and playing by the rules is rewarded and the opposite punished.

Labour’s star speaker isn’t such a star

Labour’s star speaker isn’t such a star

Nick Faith, Policy Exchange’s Director of Communications, considers Labour’s choice of guest speaker at this year’s Labour Party Conference. Nick argues that the decision to invite Bill de Blasio, Mayor of New York City, is not a particularly wise one, considering Mayor de Blasio’s record of raising taxes, unfunded spending commitments and caving in to militant trade unions.

Some tips for the party leaders’ conference speeches

Some tips for the party leaders’ conference speeches

Nick Faith, Policy Exchange’s Director of Communications, sets out how this autumn’s party conference speeches offer party leaders the opportunity to deliver a clear and strong message to the electorate ahead of the 2105 general election. Nick argues that if the political parties really want the electorate to pay detailed attention then bold ideas in the autumn could offer them the best opportunity.

Stay Up To Date

Latest Tweets

RT @judicialpwr Paul Yowell’s new book, “Constitutional Rights and Constitutional Design”, argues that courts were not designed for the kind of moral and empirical reasoning they now routinely undertake. Leading scholars and jurists respond to his arguments: judicialpowerproject… pic.twitter.com/Quuw…