Government & Politics Blogs

In and Out: White Papers Past and Present

In and Out: White Papers Past and Present

Rebecca Lowe Coulson — Policy Exchange’s State and Society Research Fellow — compares last week’s Brexit white paper with the white paper presented to parliament in 1971, which outlined the then government’s plans and argument for Britain’s accession to the European Communities.

Symbolism and Reality in Geopolitics

Symbolism and Reality in Geopolitics

Rebecca Lowe Coulson, Policy Exchange’s State and Society Research Fellow, reflects on the recent Policy Exchange event on Tim Marshall’s new book about the power and politics of flags

One Nation in a Post-Referendum World

One Nation in a Post-Referendum World

Ahead of Policy Exchange’s Conservative Party conference event on the topic, Rebecca Lowe Coulson, PX’s State and Society Research Fellow, explores the significance of the term ‘One Nation’

Making the Case Against Expansive Judicial Power

Making the Case Against Expansive Judicial Power

Reflecting on Professor Finnis’ recent lecture on the past, present and future of judicial power, and on responses to the lecture, Professors Ekins and Gee consider how best to make the case against expansive judicial power. They argue that the public and politicians should be free to debate frankly the role of the courts in our constitution, welcoming the willingness of some in the political class to restate the traditional limits on judicial power and emphasising the primacy of an elected Parliament as the safeguard against injustice and the disadvantages of remaking the law by judicial process.

Cameron was right to revise the Ministerial Code

Cameron was right to revise the Ministerial Code

ConservativeHome Assistant Editor Henry Hill quotes from John Finnis’s recent article for Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project on changes to the Ministerial Code. Professor Finnis argued that the 2010 Code implied an overarching duty to comply with international law and treaty obligations, which was not constitutionally sound.

Ministers, International Law, and the Rule of Law

Ministers, International Law, and the Rule of Law

Following the recent controversy over changes to the Ministerial Code, Professor John Finnis explains for Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project, why the 2010 Code was wrong to imply that Ministers have an overarching duty to comply with international law and treaty obligations and why the formulation used in the 2015 Code is constitutionally sound.

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