Education & Arts Blogs

Schools policy challenges after the election

Schools policy challenges after the election

In a blog based on a speech he made earlier today, Policy Exchange’s Head of Education Jonathan Simons discusses the policy challenges facing schools after the election. Jonathan argues that the closeness of the election will make it difficult to enact significant education reforms.

“I can’t do maths”

“I can’t do maths”

Natasha Porter, Policy Exchange’s Deputy Head of Education, criticises the social acceptance of poor numeracy as innate – that one can naturally be “bad at maths”. She reiterates the call from our Education Manifesto for all students to be made to study maths to age 18.

New Schools under Labour

New Schools under Labour

Natasha Porter, Policy Exchange’s Deputy Head of Education, welcomes Labour’s ongoing commitment to new schools as part of overall school improvement in coastal and former mining areas, but urges Labour to allow new parent schools to be set up there even if there isn’t a shortage of places.

Academies after 2015

Academies after 2015

Jonathan Simons, Policy Exchange’s Head of Education, sets out the three questions the government will need to answer in order to effectively implement today’s announcement from the Prime Minister that “coasting” schools will be forced to accept new leadership.

Premier League

Premier League

Jonathan Simons, Policy Exchange’s Head of Education, examines three questions raised by the recent debate on the new format school league tables: does it matter if well known public schools reside at the bottom of the table; does it matter if we can’t truly compare 2013 and 2014 results; and does it matter if league tables only give a partial picture of performance?

Why linear A-levels will work best

Why linear A-levels will work best

Natasha Porter, Policy Exchange’s Deputy Head of Education, argues that linear A-levels allow for time to teach skills that are no longer examined, giving pupils the space to explore subject areas that they’re interested in.

5 reasons why a return to grammar schools is a bad idea

5 reasons why a return to grammar schools is a bad idea

Natasha Porter and Jonathan Simons, Policy Exchange’s Deputy Head and Head of Education, argue that – contrary to what the backers of more grammar schools say – selective education was actually bad for social mobility. They show that grammar schools left behind those who did not attend them in terms of both grades and pay, that grammar schools take fewer poor students and that they did not necessarily provide a good education.

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