Richard Ekins

Head of the Judicial Power Project


0207 3402650

Richard Ekins is Head of Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project. He is Professor of Law and Constitutional Government in the University of Oxford and a Fellow of St John’s College.  His published work includes The Nature of Legislative Intent (OUP, 2012), the co-authored book Legislated Rights: Securing Human Rights through Legislation (CUP, 2018) and the edited collections The Rise and Fall of the European Constitution (Hart Publishing, 2019), Judicial Power and the Balance of Our Constitution (Policy Exchange, 2018), Judicial Power and the Left (Policy Exchange, 2017), Lord Sumption and the Limits of the Law (Hart Publishing, 2016), and Modern Challenges to the Rule of Law (LexisNexis, 2011). He has published articles in a range of leading journals, and his research has been relied upon by courts, legislators, and officials in New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

Related Posts & Publications

Mishandling the Law

Mishandling the Law

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Protecting the Constitution

Protecting the Constitution

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Lawfare

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Parliamentary Sovereignty and the Politics of Prorogation

Parliamentary Sovereignty and the Politics of Prorogation

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Securing Electoral Accountability

Securing Electoral Accountability

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