Richard Ekins

Head of the Judicial Power Project


0207 3402650

Richard Ekins is Head of Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project. He is Professor of Law and Constitutional Government in the University of Oxford and a Fellow of St John’s College.  His published work includes The Nature of Legislative Intent (OUP, 2012), the co-authored book Legislated Rights: Securing Human Rights through Legislation (CUP, 2018) and the edited collections The Rise and Fall of the European Constitution (Hart Publishing, 2019), Judicial Power and the Balance of Our Constitution (Policy Exchange, 2018), Judicial Power and the Left (Policy Exchange, 2017), Lord Sumption and the Limits of the Law (Hart Publishing, 2016), and Modern Challenges to the Rule of Law (LexisNexis, 2011). He has published articles in a range of leading journals, and his research has been relied upon by courts, legislators, and officials in New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

Related Posts & Publications

Human Rights Law Reform

Human Rights Law Reform

Related Content How and Why to Amend the Human Rights Act 1998 This paper is the text of the submission made on behalf of Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project to the Independent Human Rights Act Review, chaired by Sir Peter Gross.  This paper argues that the Human...
How to Improve the Judicial Review  and Courts Bill

How to Improve the Judicial Review and Courts Bill

Related Content The Lord Chancellor introduced the Judicial Review and Courts Bill to Parliament on 21st July this year. This paper, which draws on submissions to the Independent Review of Administrative Law and the Government Consultation on Judicial Review Reform,...
How to Reform Judicial Review

How to Reform Judicial Review

Related Content This paper is the text of Policy Exchange’s response to the Government’s Consultation on Judicial Review Reform. It builds on submissions made by Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project to the Independent Review on Administrative Law (one written by...
Ten Ways to Improve the Overseas Operations Bill

Ten Ways to Improve the Overseas Operations Bill

Related Content This short paper sets out ten ways in which the Overseas Operations Bill could be amended to improve its effectiveness and to minimise the risk of unintended consequences. None of the proposed changes are wrecking amendments. Like many...