Arts Culture

Tate goes woke: Why Tate Britain should drop the political posturing and allow its collection to speak for itself

Tate Britain is not what it was. The great, familiar works from the Cholmondeley Ladies from the start of the seventeenth century to David Hockney’s 1967 A Bigger Splash are still there. The walls of the hulking edifice on the grounds of Jeremy Bentham’s Millbank Prison retain their shrapnelled pockmarks from the War. With fewer tourists since the pandemic a visit has in some ways become a more pleasant experience – although to be fair the tourist crowds have been a fraction of those of its sister gallery a few miles downriver ever since Tate Modern opened its doors in 2000. Nevertheless a visit has become a less comfortable experience if one does not wish to be accosted by the excesses of woke culture.

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Call For Evidence: The role of libraries in the 21st century

Policy Exchange launches a call for evidence to inform a major piece of research into public libraries

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Policy Exchange’s Lindsay Johns broadcasts essay for BBC Radio 3

Lindsay Johns, Policy Exchange’s Head of Arts and Culture, defends the canon of ‘Dead White Men’ in an essay broadcast on BBC Radio 3 for its ‘Black and White’ series.

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We’ve learned so much from dead white men — trying to remove them from history is madness

Writing for the International Business Times, Policy Exchange’s Head of Arts and Culture, Lindsay Johns, argues that what is taught should be based on the quality of ideas, rather than race, gender, or sexuality

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Why do we read?

In a video to mark the 20th World Book Day, Lindsay Johns – Policy Exchange’s Head of Arts and Culture – asks the question… why do we read?

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Tate goes woke: Why Tate Britain should drop the political posturing and allow its collection to speak for itself

Tate goes woke: Why Tate Britain should drop the political posturing and allow its collection to speak for itself

Tate Britain is not what it was. The great, familiar works from the Cholmondeley Ladies from the start of the seventeenth century to David Hockney’s 1967 A Bigger Splash are still there. The walls of the hulking edifice on the grounds of Jeremy Bentham’s Millbank Prison retain their shrapnelled pockmarks from the War. With fewer tourists since the pandemic a visit has in some ways become a more pleasant experience – although to be fair the tourist crowds have been a fraction of those of its sister gallery a few miles downriver ever since Tate Modern opened its doors in 2000. Nevertheless a visit has become a less comfortable experience if one does not wish to be accosted by the excesses of woke culture.

Why do we read?

Why do we read?

In a video to mark the 20th World Book Day, Lindsay Johns – Policy Exchange’s Head of Arts and Culture – asks the question… why do we read?

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Watch the full event back here 👇 What do we want from the next Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police? With 🟠 @CommissBratton 🟠 @TrevorPTweets 🟠 @NJ_Timothy 🟠 Lord Stevens of Kirkwhelpington QPM youtube.com/watch?v=…

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Watch the full event back here 👇 What do we want from the next Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police? With 🟠 @CommissBratton 🟠 @TrevorPTweets 🟠 @NJ_Timothy 🟠 Lord Stevens of Kirkwhelpington QPM youtube.com/watch?v=nk-ASN…

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